Chicken Spagetti

When I moved to Texas I was treated to a dish called Chicken spaghetti. I  had envisioned a spaghetti sauce with chicken chunks instead of beef.. boy was I wrong. The dish is creamy and different from what most people think of spaghetti. It is a good recipe to bring to church functions and pot luck dinners as it is easy and feeds a lot of people. So, for you Northerners that have not heard of it, give it a try.

Ingredients

  • 1/2 cup diced bell pepper
  • 1/2 cup oleo or olive oil 
  • 1 medium diced onion
  • 2 can (12 oz) chicken broth more or less to taste
  • 1 can (12 oz) of cream of chicken soup
  • 1 can (12 oz) of cream of mushroom soup
  • 3 cups of diced cooked chicken
  • 1 can (16 oz) of rotel tomatoes
  • 1 pound thin spaghetti cooked in; chicken broth
  • 1/2 pound of velveeta cheese sliced; more or less to taste
  • salt and pepper to taste

 

Preparation

In a large skillet,  saute bell pepper and onion in oleo or olive oil if you prefer.  Cut chicken into bite-size pieces as it’s cooking. Use 3 cups of chicken. I’ve used canned chicken as well as dropping a whole bird in water and simmering till done, then removing the meat. If you boiled the bird, you have to stock to use for the spaghetti.

 Cook the spaghetti in boiling water or chicken broth until just slightly cooked “al dente”.  Add cut up chicken, all soups and the Ro-tel tomatoes. Stir into the spagetti. Cut the Velveeta into chunks and add.. stirring until melted.

Serve up a large portion and enjoy! The Ro-tel adds some kick.. if it is too much, use less the next time.

Published in: on March 5, 2010 at 1:20 am  Leave a Comment  
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A Simple Life

  I got wind of a new magazine called ” A Simple Life“. It looks to be very interesting and the pictures from the sneak peek have made me get a subscription. If you love primitive furniture and the simpler way of life, I think you will enjoy this magazine.  I have included the link to their site above and by clicking the picture. Check them out for yourself.

Published in: on March 4, 2010 at 8:13 pm  Leave a Comment  
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LoCal FlaVoR

Kenton is such a wonderful place. The area has a rich history, people are friendly, the architecture of the old buildings is interesting and the miles of farmland encourages one to slow down and relax a bit. Our shop is located downtown on the square in the Historic Courthouse District. When I came to Kenton 5 years ago, not much was happening on the square. Now we have several interesting and thriving businesses and upper floors are being converted into living space. I see downtown Kenton a real happening place in a few years.

Kenton is also home to some very talented local artists. I am very fortunate to have several of these artists as friends. Sycamore Circle Heritage Farms produces hand-made herbal soaps with herbs they grow on their farm. Their family is  four generations working together on various aspects of farming. They also have a concentration on nineteenth century (or “heirloom”) herbs, apples and poultry. Sycamore Circle offers several lines.. herbal, specialty and goat milk soaps, soaps with Civil War and Victorian fragrances and their incredibly popular Foot Scrubbies and Doggie Bath line. They can be found at several markets and craft shows in Ohio, at Whole Foods and at Helen’s Gifts in downtown Kenton.

Another very talented local artist is Marilyn Reed. Her motto is “if it doesn’t move ~ Paint it!” The owner of Marilyn’s Artistry, Marilyn has painted everything from wooden bowls to murals on buildings. Kenton’s own Michael Angelos is a show case of her work. A lifelong student of the arts, she is inspired by the latest trends and colors and a master of many techniques.  At the shop we sell her hand painted furniture, candle boxes, plates and what ever else she can get a paint brush on. Right now we have a wonderful table with a checkerboard painted on top and a delightful potting bench. Be sure to check them out when you stop by.

When you do craft shows, you meet  and get to know the regular professional crafters. Over the years we have become friends with talented artists and always enjoy seeing new items they bring forth. Cindy and Frank were two crafters we enjoyed and they constantly had new items. Their booth was always attractive and full of people buying.. a nice thing to have next to your booth. And, I learned about crafting from them.. from setting up my booth to always have something new. Imagine my surprise when I found out they lived right here in Kenton! I begged and pleaded and finally have some of their items in the shop. This house is only one of their lighted houses. We have smaller, shorter and wider ones.. and they are available in mustard, burgundy and cream. Their lighted church is darling.. and the price point they offer can not be found else where. They also make a narrow shelf that we are constantly selling out of. They do not have a web site but can be found at many of the finer craft shows in Ohio. Look for them at shows we will attend.

Because we started out as crafters, we love to support other crafters. If you make a quality hand-made country prim product and would like to consign at the shop, stop by and discuss it with us. As the area grows and more tourists come through, there will be a market for locally made items. If your not ready to sell and just need some advice, also feel free to stop by. I am more than happy to share the knowledge I have picked up over the years. Who knows, someday you too may have a business on the Square.

Do You Have a Great Idea..

Have you come up with a nice display combination?  Have you repurposed an item in a unique way? I know I get a lot of inspriation from seeing what others have done and I love those ‘I never would have thought about that’ ideas I stumble across.

Share your tips and ideas with others by sending them to me for posting here on our Blog. If I add them to the blog I will give you one of our highly scented and long burning candles at half price or a $5 gift card for the shop.

And if you like the little bench in the picture, click the picture or HERE to check out the Etsy shop I found it on. Nice stuff.. her motto is “ Because a Womans Place is in the Woodshop”. I love it!

Published in: on March 1, 2010 at 1:23 am  Leave a Comment  
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EnoUgh of ThiS WeaTher

Ok.. who is with me on this..

They are talking about more snow coming this week. Ugh!! People on some of the boards I’m on are without power in the Northeast.. and my Florida friends teeth are chattering with the unusual cold they have been having. Crops and tropical fish in the south are being destroyed with the cold. I think we will feel the effects of this weather for a while. We are paying higher utility bills now and will pay extra for other things throughout the coming year. Thank goodness they are talking warmer temps next weekend. I’m really ready for warmer weather.

Published in: on February 28, 2010 at 10:05 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Pumpkin Crunch Cake.. yum yum!

pumpkin-crunch-cakeSince we are selling a lot of our Pumpkin Crunch candles and melts, I’m passing along the recipe from my fragrance supplier to have on hand when every body comes into your house and starts asking “what are you baking?”

Pumpkin Crunch Cake Recipe:

Ingredients:

1 package yellow cake mix

1 can (16 oz.) pumpkin

1 can (12 oz.) evaporated milk

3 eggs

1 1/2 cup sugar

4 teaspoons pumpkin pie spice

1/2 teaspoon salt

1 cup chopped pecans

1 cup melted butter

whipped topping.

Directions: Preheat oven to 350F. Grease bottom of  9 x 13 pan. Combine pumpkin, evaporated milk, eggs, sugar, pumpkin pie spice, and salt in bowl. Pour into pan. Sprinkle dry yellow cake mix evenly over pumpkin mixture. Sprinkle chopped pecans over cake mix. Drizzle melted butter evenly over everything. Bake for about 50 minutes. Cool completely and serve with whipped topping. Refrigerate left overs.

Published in: on October 30, 2009 at 1:12 am  Comments (2)  
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FeaThEr TrEEs

feathertree-5Christmas items have been arriving at the shop for months now. It has been no fun to have all this cool stuff and not be able to have it on the floor. In a few weeks we will be phasing out Fall and bringing out the Christmas goodies in preparation for our Open House November 7th.

One of the items we have new this year are Feather Trees. I did some checking on the internet and found out some history of these trees. I’m going to pretty much quote a page I found at Victorian.com. This site has a lot of cool information if you are into Victorian decorating so check them out when you finish reading this. Here is their article:

Yes, it is actually true that feather trees were the first artificial Christmas trees and they were originally made in Germany as early as 1845.  Like many inventions, tabletop feather trees came about out of necessity. By the mid-19th century, decorated trees were more popular than ever; however, in Germany deforestation was widespread, especially during the holiday season. It had become the fashion to chop off the tip off a large Fir tree to use as a Christmas tree; however, this practice prevented the tree from growing taller and thus made it useless as a timber tree. Statutes were enacted to limit people from having more than one tree, hence protecting the forests. With the introduction of the “goosefeather” tree, this problem was resolved. Goose feathers were plentiful and these feather trees began to be produced as a cottage industry as the alternative to cutting a live tree. These goose feather trees became the first artificial Christmas trees. Metal wire or sticks were covered with goose, turkey, ostrich or swan feathers. The feather sticks were drilled into a larger one to resemble the branches on a tree; the feathers were often died green to imitate pine needles. The trees were made to resemble the locally growing white pines of the German forestland, so they had wide spaces between their branches, short “needles,” and composition “berries” on the end of every branch tip.

feathertree-3Meanwhile in America, cut live trees were the cherished way to make the holiday come alive.  When the Germans immigrated to the United States, they took their beloved portable feather trees with them to use in their new homes. While it was the German immigrants that introduced feather Christmas trees into the U.S., the practice of using artificial trees really did not take off in America until Sears Roebuck first advertised artificial trees for sale in their 1913 catalogs.  Often they had berries and candleholders at the branch-tips and a round white base.  They ranged in size from 55 inches to 17 inches tall.  By the late teens, Japan followed suit and manufactured feather trees for the U.S. market.

In the 1920s feather Christmas trees were gaining in popularity, especially to European-born Americans continuing to follow their customs. However, by the mid-1930s their popularity declined somewhat as the tree farm industry grew.  In an effort to revive the market, Germany began supplying Montgomery Ward with a wider variety of color choices and fancier designs on the tree stands. Artificial trees all but disappeared during WWII. Then after the war, in the 1950s, feather trees were replaced by artificial trees made of synthetic substances, like visca and aluminum.  It’s no small wonder why feather trees are now a popular decorating choice for people with period homes.

Published in: on October 2, 2009 at 1:56 am  Leave a Comment  
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ChriStmaS in OcTobeR

findlay 09-1The Findlay craft show is this coming weekend, October 3-4, and we are very busy getting ready. We will close early Friday to get set up for the show and be closed Saturday. With all the Christmas items we have received around the shop the last few months it will be nice to get away and just enjoy Fall. The weather should be cool and crisp, perfect weather for strolling around the Craft Show. If you have never been to this show you are missing a wonderful way to spend a day.

Findlay’s Christmas in October is one of NW Ohio’s largest and most distinctive Fall Craft Shows. Every year it features over 300 exhibits from 10 States. With ten buildings, two tents & dozens of outdoor locations brimming full of Americana, Country, Contemporary, Folk Art and Victorian Arts & Crafts it is fun for the entire family!

You can pre-order your candles and lotions from us now so you can enjoy the show and pick up your items when you are done. No need to see us early to get the best selection or worry about your favorites being sold out. Buckeye is always sold out no matter how many I bring and we have some wonderful new fragrances that we are expecting to sell out of as well. Amish Harvest and Toasted Hazelnut have received many comments around the shop while being tested and will be available at the show. Other favorites will be  Caramel Crunch, Glazed Baklava, Coffe Cake , Pink Sugar and Pumpkin Crunch. In the lotions it is hard to beat Pink Sugar and Sandalwood Vanilla.

So come see us in Findlay this weekend. To get $1 off admission see HERE. Come for the day or make a weekend of it and stay in one of Findlay’s many fine hotel accommodations. We hope to see you there!

Another YeaR

01010622Here it is September. It is Fair time and also our anniversary. On September 18th we will have been open for 2 years. It has been a lot of work, but also a lot of fun. Our downtown is growing and we have fun events like Sidewalk Sales, our Fall Fest and Christmas around the Square. In the shop we have a week long event the week before the Thanksgiving week called Hunters Widow Party. During that week we have our specialty Dip mixes made as well as delicious, hot Cider and you shoot our Big Buck of Savings for your discount. If  you land in the grass or trees, or even hit the wall,  you get a 5% discount. Better shots will get you larger discounts.. all the way up to a ‘kill’ shot worth 30% off you merchandise. It is a fun time for everybody as most of the men are in trees hunting the Hardin County bucks and the women are preparing for the holidays. You can get a head start on Christmas gifts or just add some holiday cheer to your decor at great savings during this week.

gasgasMost businesses keep stats on sales figures, weather and whatever might be related to their sales figures. We have been doing that almost from the beginning as well. Tracking weather, foot traffic and starting last year, the price of gas. Since we started a new year it required a new spread sheet. I copied the old one and began changing the figures to reflect our new year.  One thing I noticed was our gas prices a year ago were $1/gallon higher. Other September events were hurricane Ike headed to shore and around the 15th the Market crashed.

So much has happened over the last year.. good, bad, exciting and ugly. Here at the shop we are looking forward to what this next year will bring.

Published in: on September 12, 2009 at 6:38 pm  Leave a Comment  
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Rusting Recipes

rustThe last buying trip I picked up a lot of rusty items. Rusty stuff looks so nice with primitive decor. Buying pieces already rusted is one way to get them.. and another way is to rust items yourself. I cruised the net and found some nice recipes for rusting your own items.

This recipe I got from Two old Crows and will nicely rust safety pins, jingle bells, or anything else you want to ‘age’ for your primitive creations.The most important thing to remember about rusting, is that you will want to buy the cheap brand of pins, safety pins, bells..etc that you can find. The more expensive brands have a shellac coating on them that you will have to sand off before rusting. Makes sure they are NOT brass either -brass will not rust.Do this outside away from children and pets…..the fumes are terrible !

Ingredients:
1/2 cup cider vinegar
1/2 cup bleach
1 teaspoon salt

Directions :
Combine the ingredients in an old quart jar.
Add items you want to rust and cover loosely – place in a safe spot and let set for at least 2 days.
Line a tray with a couple of layers of paper towel and remove the items with an old fork from the mixture. place in the sunshine …….the items will begin to rust as they dry. Move them around so that they dry on all sides.

Caution: do not throw the mixture down the sink- dispose of properly where no animal or child could come in contact with.

And here’s another recipe I found at the Home Decor Ideas blog.

For heavy rusting:

 Measure 2 cups of CLOROX or any household bleach and pour into a metal cookie sheet with sides.

Add l cup of APPLE CIDER vinegar and mix thoroughly.

This must be done in a well-ventilated area or outdoors. Use an all-metal cookie sheet with sides. DO NOT use Teflon-coated, enamelware, glass or plastic containers.

 Immerse tin into solution. Tin has to be completely covered. It will start rusting immediately in the solution. It takes approx. 2-3 min.

Lift out of solution and stand on edge to dry. It will become very rusty. Let air dry completely for approx. 1-3 hours or overnight. When it is completely dry, wipe some of the rust off with a dry cloth…this is optional.

 I found another recipe that is not as toxic at Primitive Folk Art. First, place your items to be rusted into a container that has a lid – She used an empty glass candle jar. Pour enough bleach into the container to cover the items you are rusting, and then put the lid on. Let it sit like this for about 24 hours. Then drain the bleach into the toilet (get a second use out of it as a disinfectant!), leaving the metal items still damp in the jar. Next cover them with cider vinegar and add in a healthy dose of salt. Cover again, and let sit overnight. Pour the used vinegar down the drain (you can also get a second use of this as a drain unclogger if it follows a dose of baking soda), leaving the damp bells/safety pins/what have you in the jar. Put the jar out in the sun to dry, uncovered, and the metal items in it will rust as they dry.

Published in: on June 13, 2009 at 2:30 am  Comments (1)  
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